The $ campaign in the Virginia governor’s race – Ballotpedia News

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Welcome to Friday August 6, Brew. Here’s what to expect at the start of your day:

  1. Virginia gubernatorial candidates have spent more than $ 28 million so far on this year’s election
  2. The group submits enough signatures for a police-related voting measure to qualify for the ballot in Austin, Texas
  3. #FridayTrivia: which state was the second to lower its voting age to 18?

Virginia gubernatorial candidates have spent more than $ 28 million so far on this year’s election

Virginia is one of two states, along with New Jersey, that hold gubernatorial elections on Nov. 2. Investment director Glenn Youngkin (R) won the Virginia Republican Party convention on May 8, and former Governor Terry McAuliffe (R) won the Democratic Primary on June 8.

The outcome of this election, in addition to the state House of Delegates elections, will also determine Virginia’s tiercé status. Virginia became a Democratic trio in 2019. Let’s check out the latest campaign fundraising reports for this race, covering data through June 30.

McAuliffe raised $ 20.3 million. Youngkin raised over $ 7.5 million and loaned $ 12 million to his campaign. The two candidates combined have spent $ 28.2 million on this race so far.

Breaking down these expenses even further, the majority of the total expenses for both campaigns were spent on the production and placement of media ads. Forty-one percent of all McAuliffe spending through June 30 went to Grassroots Media LLC, which provides strategic media planning services and does media buying. Likewise, 42% of all Youngkin’s spending went to Smart Media Group LLC, an advertising and media buying agency.

Liberation Party candidate Princess Blanding has raised $ 20,604 through June 30 and spent $ 11,043, according to the latest campaign funding reports. His expenses were mostly for campaign supplies and canvassing costs, with his largest expense – $ 1,193 – being on court signs. Independent candidate Paul Davis has raised and spent less than $ 5,000 for the campaign so far.

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The group submits enough signatures for a police-related voting measure to qualify for the ballot in Austin, Texas

The city of Austin, Texas clerk announced on Aug. 3 that supporters had submitted enough valid signatures to qualify a ballot initiative that would set a minimum number of police personnel. The city council has 10 days to approve the measure as a municipal ordinance or to put the initiative on the ballot. The deadline for the city council to submit the initiative to the November 2 ballot is August 16.

The measure :

  • establish a minimum staffing requirement for the police department based on Austin’s population, which would require the city to hire additional police officers;
  • state that new police recruits should reflect Austin’s demographics;
  • add additional training time required for police officers; and
  • add new requirements to sit on the city’s Public Safety Commission.

Organizers submitted 27,778 signatures and the clerk’s office predicted 25,786 were valid. Petitioners for the initiative must collect 20,000 signatures to qualify a measure for the ballot.

Save Austin Now, which submitted the signatures in support of the initiative, said on its website: “City council funded the Austin police by 30% last year, and our city has seen a surge. increasing crime rate since then. This measure is designed to “ensure a sufficient number of police officers for a city of our size and to make this calculation independent of the whims of the city council”. A statement released by Austin City Council member Greg Casar said: “George Floyd was killed a year ago, and instead of working on police reform, this group is scaring and trying to ‘avoid the responsibility of the police. Their petition campaign involves writing a blank check for taxpayer funds to their own department, while cutting funds for all of our other public employees and our critical public safety needs. This petition goes directly against what the Black Lives Matter movement is. “

Ballotpedia covers voting metrics related to local police. Voters in six cities across the country have approved three and rejected three so far this year. Voters in Cleveland and Minneapolis will decide local police-related voting measures on November 2.

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#FridayTrivia: which state was the second to lower its voting age to 18?

In Tuesday’s Brew, we highlighted Georgia’s 1943 voting measure that lowered the state’s voting age from 21 to 18. Voters approved this change 78 years ago, and it led to the consideration of the 26th Amendment to the Constitution, which lowered the nationwide voting age to 18.

In this story, we noted that in 1955, 12 years after voters passed Georgia’s Voting Age Amendment, a second state lowered its voting age to 18. This was before Alaska and Hawaii became states in 1959 and adopted the age of 19. and 20 years, respectively. Which state was the second to lower its voting age to 18?

  1. Indiana
  2. Kansas
  3. Kentucky
  4. Caroline from the south


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